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I Was Standing In The Factory In San Pellegrino: The National Geographic Society


commercial water filterSan Pellegrino, Italy, at the foot of the Italian Alps, where San Pellegrino water is sealed in those shapely dark green bottles.

Leave aside that the glass bottles weigh more than the water they contain, or the journey those bottles of water have to make, by truck and ship and truck again, to land on a grocery shelf or café table in Manhattan or St. Louis.

The bottles themselves have to be washed before being filled. As Pellegrino’s wizened factory operations manager explained, they wash the bottles with‚ĶPellegrino water. Pellegrino water comes out of the ground uncarbonated. The company harvests the carbon dioxide from that spring, purifies it, compresses it, trucks it north to Pellegrino, and injects it into the water as part of the bottling process. That’s where it starts getting intriguing, right? Consequently the silliness took a leap. Where, I’m almost sure I asked, do the bubbles in Pellegrino come from? Normally, pellegrino has another spring to the south in central Italy that is naturally carbonated. Before filling them with Pellegrino water. You see, the plant manager’s eyes lit up.



commercial water filter Unless you live in a developing world nation without safe tap water, actually, unless you’re struggling in the aftermath of a natural disaster, all bottled water really falls into that category.

That’s okay, surely, a lot of things I like are indulgences. Oreos, The Good Wife, Italian Merlot, even the ice cubes I all but require in the glass of water that sits on my desk through the work day.

There is a fresh burst of controversy about bottled water on college campuses, specifically, around whether bottled water could be sold in the dining halls of and Canadian universities. As indicated by figures from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, last week, the University of Vermont became the latest of 15 campuses in the and Canada to ban the sale of bottled water. In consonance with figures from the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education, last week, the University of Vermont became the latest of 15 campuses in the and Canada to ban the sale of bottled water. There is a fresh burst of controversy about bottled water on college campuses, specifically, around whether bottled water should’ve been sold in the dining halls of and Canadian universities.

Dozens more campuses have active campaigns to discourage bottled water purchases including giving out free reuseable water bottles to students, and providing elegant, easy to use bottle filling stations. (Try to fill a water bottle from a water fountain sometime


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