Revolutionary Graphene Filter Could Solve Water Crisis – The Graphene-Based Filter Could’Ve Been Used To Filter Chemicals

industrial water filters While in consonance with the World Economic Forum’s Global Risks Report, lack of access to safe, clean water is the biggest risk to society over the coming decade.

Quite a few of these risks might be mitigated by the development of this filter, that is so strong and stable that it can be used for extended periods in the harshest corrosive environments, and with less maintenance than other filters on the market. The research team was led by Associate Professor Mainak Majumder from Monash University. Lots of info can be found easily on the internet. Associate Professor Majumder said the key to making their filter was developing a viscous sort of graphene oxide that could’ve been spread very thinly with a blade.

This technique allows the filters to be produced much faster and in larger sizes, that is critical for developing commercial applications. The graphenebased filter will be used to filter chemicals, viruses, or bacteria from a range of liquids. It going to be used to purify water, dairy products or wine, or in the production of pharmaceuticals. In the past they had been difficult and expensive to produce, research team member and PhD candidate. Said scientists had known for years that graphene filters had impressive qualities.

---

industrial water filtersGraphene is a lattice of carbon atoms so thin it’s considered to be twodimensional.

Filters of ‘nano cellulose’ have been tested in two Spanish factories and a Spanish water company, and are found to be highly effective. The tests conclude the ‘EUfunded’ project Nano Select, led by Luleå University of Technology. It has been hailed as a ‘wondermaterial’ because of its incredible performance characteristics and range of potential applications.

Graphene is a wonder material saddled with great expectations. Discovered in 2004, it is 1 million times thinner than a human hair, 300 times stronger than steel and it’s the best known conductor of heat and electricity. The researchers in Jonathan Claussen’s lab at Iowa State University have been looking for ways to use graphene and its amazing properties in their sensors and other technologies.

Collaborative research at Notre Dame has demonstrated that electronic interactions play a significant role in the dimensional crossover of semiconductor nanomaterials.

The laboratory of Masaru Kuno, professor of chemistry. Collaborative research at Notre Dame has demonstrated that electronic interactions play a significant role in the dimensional crossover of semiconductor nanomaterials. The laboratory of Masaru Kuno, professor of chemistry. 9 comments

---

Be the first to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.


*